Growing pains – my views on growing an audience

I have noticed that a lot of people have been asking for advice on how to grow their blog over the last few weeks. I am not sure why that all of a sudden people seem to be asking me this.

Maybe I have passed a certain threshold of followers that has given me blogging credibility and people now see me as someone who knows what they are doing?

What I think has happened, is that many people have started blogs in January and seen that it is very difficult to actually get anyone to look at your work. So, they have started to do what any practical person would and are trying to gather information as to how to build an audience.

Well, I will address this again, but only briefly as I have addressed it many times. The first thing you need to understand is that after you put up your post on WordPress or any other platform, there will be a brief window of time where it is visible in a public space – e.g. reader. After this, it gets buried by everyone else posting stuff.

If you are writing about stuff that is of general interest, a post about how adjectives work, for example, there is a chance of getting some traffic via a search engine, but it will be tiny. I wrote about nouns once and now if you type ‘thematically meandering’ into google on the first page is that post – I have no idea why.

Presumably, if that post is high on googles rankings you would expect that post to be viewed more than others: it isn’t.

So, you’re not likely to get many people who stumble upon your blog; you’re going to have to go out and get people!

Marketing isn’t a massive Industry by happenstance. Read their work, comment on it, like and share etc. They may do the same for you, and you can grow from there. What I am trying to tell you is that it is a lot of work to build an audience, and you should probably spend a decent portion of your time marketing.

I attended a course once that was part of a scientific program, it had a lady there talking about social media and influencing – so we could better communicate our work. She said you should spend around 10 % of your time on marketing, and after this year of blogging, I tend to agree.

The Utopian dream of writing a blog post with your coffee in the morning, posting it online and having everyone read it and even make money from it is an utter fantasy! And we should all be embarrassed to have even thought like this.

It is no less passive than any other form of employment, and it is a lot of hard work! Sorry to ruin your fantasy, but isn’t that always the way?

Normal programming will resume next week.

Update: I will add useful links here as and when I find them.

19/8/19 – I have realised that people have been re-posting their old posts. When they appear in the reader feed they often have hundreds of likes and comments. I had no idea how they are doing this until now. They use a plugin for WordPress that automatically re-posts for them. However, there is a way to do this manually. If you look at any of your posts and then click on the ‘document’ tab and look at the bit where it says ‘status and visibility’ you can see when it was published and change it to a time in the future. Then it will be re-posted at that time. Here is a link as to why you might want to do this.

Go here for all your WordPress search engine optimization needs

The Gamification of Traffic

It’s morally wrong to allow a sucker to keep his money

I have had a cursory interest in the gamification of moving online traffic ever since I started this blog. I developed this interest as soon as I realised people liked my posts without reading them. The reason they were doing this was that, if you have your default settings, you will receive an email inviting you to go and view their blog. It doesn’t take a genius to realise that you can quickly like a bunch of posts and drive some traffic towards your site.

To me, ‘gamification’ is where we —  the players — try and drive as much traffic (the scoring system of the game) to our sites as possible, by various means.

I have also mentioned previously that I have been learning computer programming as a side project. I imagine you have put two and two together and guessed what I am about to say next. Well, the actual answer is 3.99. I did make a Twitter bot. I was in need of a project to do and thought that this would be a big challenge. It turns out it took all of five minutes for me to be registered as a ‘developer’ and get access to Twitters API.

I followed a short tutorial, and now I have an automated script that follows everyone that follows me. This is a very tame thing to do when you have access to the API, I could have followed all my follower’s followers, and their followers, and anyone who fit the search criteria that was provided by my script. What I am trying to say is, I could have followed, retweeted, liked, and all the rest of it, at the pace of a machine.

Inevitably, I would have gained many followers as this is what happens everywhere on the internet. Liking, sharing and commenting are the three things anyone online marketing expert will tell you to do if they are telling the truth, if they are professional, they will use the words ‘interact or engage’.

I choose not to do this for a few reasons, firstly I don’t want to get banned, and secondly, I’m lazy and don’t want to have to sift through tons of useless tweets to see the things I am interested in.

I am not sure how I stumbled upon this site, but stumble I did. I found a site that industrialises what I have just been talking about, not only will the program, follow/unfollow to your heart’s desire, it will also suggest content for you to tweet about.

Here is a quote from their site.

Following relevant people on Twitter is a great way to gain new followers. Find people who are interested in similar topics, follow them and often they will follow you back. This is a great way to build up your Twitter account.’

Now I have seen this I cannot un-see it.

If you’re anything like me, cynical, you will have come across some profiles that follow thousands and have thousands of followers. Then you look at their tweets, and there is practically no engagement. To me, this a sign of some strange things going on. Why should I be surprised? Of course, this is what happens.

This is the game, some people choose not to play, some people are ignorant of it or ignore it, and some people play it better than others. This could be said about everything in life.

When I was a teenager, I used to play a game on MySpace, yes MySpace. The game was a simple game based around Prohibition-era gangsters. For a while I was playing perfectly innocently, then I joined a group of players. One of which was top of the leaderboard for our region. He showed us the ropes, and by ropes I mean bots. Cut to several months later, we were all at the top of the leaderboards. At the time using these bots was the most natural thing in the world, no one ever got banned, and we figured everyone was using them, after all, everyone we knew was using them, and many people were making a lot of money from them. What the moral of this brief aside is I am not sure, but I do know that fair playing fields do not exist.

                        It’s morally wrong to allow a sucker to keep his money W.C. Fields.

I am wondering if social media is a failed project. I can imagine a world where all of our interactions online are done with bots on our behalf. If you’re not going to improve the social standing of your social media identity, then you will be relegated to the lower rungs of society, where you will be interacting with everyone else who is ‘not an influencer’.

Soon your social standing will sink so low that you will only be able to talk to people in person! Which as we all know, does not scale. How could you geotarget your audience and benchmark their CTR (click through rate) if you have to interface with them organically? The only space for your clickbait titles will be on your t-shirt, that you didn’t even buy from an exclusive online store.

I think I may have gone off topic slightly.

Presumably, we want people to see our work, for whatever reason. Otherwise, we would keep a diary. So, do we sit and wait for people to come, which I assume is very sub-optimal. Or do we spend some time ‘marketing’ our content? Furthermore, If we choose to play the game, do we strive to play the best we can? Or do we make up the numbers?

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